Music News / Reviews

mcherry

🥑
Admin
Joined
May 15, 2019
Messages
637
The album promo at the end of the S-K announcement feels...tacky? I can't believe this has happened prior to me finally seeing them later this year.
I haven’t seen them before either and going with @Teeeee later this year was going to be awesome. I’m bummed. I actually like what I’ve heard so far from the new album but it’s going to leave a bad taste in my mouth knowing Janet wasn’t happy with it.
 

ayayrawn

Member
Joined
May 15, 2019
Messages
174
Age
24
Location
Louisville, KY
I am HIGHLY DISPLEASED! And looking for someone to blame.

*Annie Clark, paging Annie Clark. Annie, you are wanted in HR's office IMMEDIATELY! Bring your badge with you*
But really tho. It's obvious that Annie had waaay more influence over the making of this record than at least I was anticipating. I'm fine with a band changing their sound and style as long as it doesn't hurt the core of your band, which it seems like has happened here.

I wish Carrie and Annie had just made a collaborative album together instead of this happening.
 
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Waitressboy

Member
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
73
Location
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Hungria is an Argentinian band of math rock and they released their second album this year. They are giving it away on their Bandcamp site (the digital edition, I mean). I don't know, maybe they'll release it on physical format if they sell enough copies.
I thought some of you might enjoy their music:
 

tonythegamer

Active Member
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
447
Age
19
Location
Michigan
Review Time!

Talkie - Everything Matters

I know this is a smaller indie band, but these guys are awesome! I wish their album was on vinyl!

8/10

The term "summer songs" is a label that I feel can apply to a broad range of music out there. You have many people who will jam the latest dance pop song that's probably going to make a ton of money and be played in clubs all around the world. Some can listen to folk and country music and feel that summer has truly arrived. I, on the other hand, can listen to an indie rock album with twangy guitars and harmonized vocals, and think I'm on a beach listening to a local act play their latest set, and feel more bliss than when listening to the other two categories combined.

Maybe it's because this band is one of many that sets their sights on past sounds for inspiration, and then reworks it to have a modern coat of paint. Not saying there's anything wrong with that. It's just a fact of the matter that this band's sound comes from influences of 70's surf rock, 90's indie music, and a little bit of soft rock, so obviously it's all a matter of whether or not those styles appeal to you if you're debating listening to this band.

The leanings into surf rock being the heaviest of the bunch, I have to infer that this genre choice is due to the band wanting to pay respects to a monumental genre that's integral to the surf culture of California, where the band hails from. The band seems as though they don't want to just be, "another surf rock band," instead wanting to play it their own way.

Sure, this album can feel a little derivative at times, and the band's not always on it's A-game when it comes to doing something fresh and exciting with the styles of music it draws so heavily from, but, at the same time, when it pulls so much from those very same sounds, relief and euphoria is all that one can feel. Songs such as Headfone, Part 2, Whatever, Proper Day, and others on here elicit this state of mind where I can daydream sandy beaches and blue waters into reality, this album being the background music for such a wondrous destination. I guess it also helps that these songs are infectious and singable as well.

Though there are many beach songs on here, with titles such as Bummer Summerr and Surf's Down, it's not the album's one and only focus. I can bet something else you can reminisce about while listening to the song Boring Now is a time where everything in life was simpler and more carefree. A time where the world wasn't as confusing or menacing. A time where life could truly be an adventure waiting to happen.

This album's not perfect, in fact there are a few songs I think are merely OK, such as Walk Away, and I'm Alright, but even at the end of their run times I'm not really feeling disappointed or upset. I still get inklings of the very same soft rock and 90's music that I grew up on, just not enough to suck me in as much as some of the other songs on offer here.

At the end of the day, this is an album made to pay tribute to the past, and it perfectly fulfills it's goal and then some, with fantastic additions to these genres. Talkie has done these genres proud, as they have crafted a record that pays homage to these monolithic phases of rock music, and yet simultaneously makes them their own.

Summer's here folks. Let's enjoy it while it lasts.
 

GritNGlitter

Fancy
Admin
Joined
May 15, 2019
Messages
743
Location
PDX
Review Time!

Talkie - Everything Matters

I know this is a smaller indie band, but these guys are awesome! I wish their album was on vinyl!

8/10

The term "summer songs" is a label that I feel can apply to a broad range of music out there. You have many people who will jam the latest dance pop song that's probably going to make a ton of money and be played in clubs all around the world. Some can listen to folk and country music and feel that summer has truly arrived. I, on the other hand, can listen to an indie rock album with twangy guitars and harmonized vocals, and think I'm on a beach listening to a local act play their latest set, and feel more bliss than when listening to the other two categories combined.

Maybe it's because this band is one of many that sets their sights on past sounds for inspiration, and then reworks it to have a modern coat of paint. Not saying there's anything wrong with that. It's just a fact of the matter that this band's sound comes from influences of 70's surf rock, 90's indie music, and a little bit of soft rock, so obviously it's all a matter of whether or not those styles appeal to you if you're debating listening to this band.

The leanings into surf rock being the heaviest of the bunch, I have to infer that this genre choice is due to the band wanting to pay respects to a monumental genre that's integral to the surf culture of California, where the band hails from. The band seems as though they don't want to just be, "another surf rock band," instead wanting to play it their own way.

Sure, this album can feel a little derivative at times, and the band's not always on it's A-game when it comes to doing something fresh and exciting with the styles of music it draws so heavily from, but, at the same time, when it pulls so much from those very same sounds, relief and euphoria is all that one can feel. Songs such as Headfone, Part 2, Whatever, Proper Day, and others on here elicit this state of mind where I can daydream sandy beaches and blue waters into reality, this album being the background music for such a wondrous destination. I guess it also helps that these songs are infectious and singable as well.

Though there are many beach songs on here, with titles such as Bummer Summerr and Surf's Down, it's not the album's one and only focus. I can bet something else you can reminisce about while listening to the song Boring Now is a time where everything in life was simpler and more carefree. A time where the world wasn't as confusing or menacing. A time where life could truly be an adventure waiting to happen.

This album's not perfect, in fact there are a few songs I think are merely OK, such as Walk Away, and I'm Alright, but even at the end of their run times I'm not really feeling disappointed or upset. I still get inklings of the very same soft rock and 90's music that I grew up on, just not enough to suck me in as much as some of the other songs on offer here.

At the end of the day, this is an album made to pay tribute to the past, and it perfectly fulfills it's goal and then some, with fantastic additions to these genres. Talkie has done these genres proud, as they have crafted a record that pays homage to these monolithic phases of rock music, and yet simultaneously makes them their own.

Summer's here folks. Let's enjoy it while it lasts.
Aw, TALKIE! Chris Isaacs (guitar) is my friend's little brother. We took him and one of his buddies to Warped Tour when he was like, 14. So cute that he's a little rock star now. Yes, I'm aware that he's in his 30s now.

Also, big sisters never see baby brothers as fully grown up.
 

Chimichanga

New Member
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
11
Location
Seattle, Wash.
As a relative newcomer to David Berman and his work with the Joos, I can't really do a comprehensive write up about the new Purple Mountains record, but holy shit is it really really (really really) good. And I've only been able to listen at work, 50% distracted. Easily in my top 5 of the year so far (though I haven't put much thought into that either...).

Anybody else have thoughts?
 

debianlinux

Member
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
212
Location
NC
As a relative newcomer to David Berman and his work with the Joos, I can't really do a comprehensive write up about the new Purple Mountains record, but holy shit is it really really (really really) good. And I've only been able to listen at work, 50% distracted. Easily in my top 5 of the year so far (though I haven't put much thought into that either...).

Anybody else have thoughts?
I thought it was a watered down, monotonous version of modest mouse. That may sound bad but bear in mind Modest Mouse are likely in my top 3 of best bands ever that I love and would take to the desert island. Unfortunately purple mountains would not even approach said list.
 

Chimichanga

New Member
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
11
Location
Seattle, Wash.
I thought it was a watered down, monotonous version of modest mouse. That may sound bad but bear in mind Modest Mouse are likely in my top 3 of best bands ever that I love and would take to the desert island. Unfortunately purple mountains would not even approach said list.
it's funny you compare it to Modest Mouse, because when I think of bands that have veered from pointedly monotonous to laughably watered down, Modest Mouse definitely comes to mind. I say that as a fan of Modest Mouse; most releases after 2004 are boringly overproduced and most releases before 1997 are in dire need of tonal variety. That aside, I think Berman's approach to the tone of the album was deliberate, and I appreciate his artistic choices in that regard. I'd even probably recommend it to fans of Modest Mouse who feel alienated by Issac's current obsession with studio fuckery.

on the subject of desert islands, I don't think I've ever heard an album on release day and fallen so completely in love with it that I could put it on such a list. Further, comparing any new release to the records you'd take to a desert island sounds like an exhausting experience... honest question, how do you enjoy something when it doesn't immediately stack up to your top 3?
 

dhodo

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 15, 2019
Messages
885
Age
32
Location
Charleston, SC
I thought it was a watered down, monotonous version of modest mouse. That may sound bad but bear in mind Modest Mouse are likely in my top 3 of best bands ever that I love and would take to the desert island. Unfortunately purple mountains would not even approach said list.
I love Modest Mouse and Silver Jews and I am really confused by this. What about it sounds like Modest Mouse to you?
 

debianlinux

Member
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
212
Location
NC
it's funny you compare it to Modest Mouse, because when I think of bands that have veered from pointedly monotonous to laughably watered down, Modest Mouse definitely comes to mind. I say that as a fan of Modest Mouse; most releases after 2004 are boringly overproduced and most releases before 1997 are in dire need of tonal variety. That aside, I think Berman's approach to the tone of the album was deliberate, and I appreciate his artistic choices in that regard. I'd even probably recommend it to fans of Modest Mouse who feel alienated by Issac's current obsession with studio fuckery.

on the subject of desert islands, I don't think I've ever heard an album on release day and fallen so completely in love with it that I could put it on such a list. Further, comparing any new release to the records you'd take to a desert island sounds like an exhausting experience... honest question, how do you enjoy something when it doesn't immediately stack up to your top 3?
Clearly things that stack up to top 3 occur maybe once a decade. Most recently was Big Thief, so it still happens. Meanwhile I just enjoy the hell out of music, prefer variety (don’t recall the last time I spun MM), and have a high affinity for new experiences (which I felt purple mountains failed to deliver). In other words, enjoyment and peak experiences are completely separate things but sometimes a typical experience is reminiscent of a peak example. Your criticism of MM is perfectly spot on, however. I think everything past We Were Dead is boring as hell. I’ve had a few decades to digest MM and a week on PM. I certainly have not arrived at any solid conclusions but you requested thoughts at this point in time.
 
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