Jazz

MikeH

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I believe the intent at this point is to be in-store, with the usual rules that online left overs can only go online at 6pm. It may change. If the RSD people catch things on Discogs before that and can track them back to a store, they get banned from future participation.
My local still isn't really open especially for an event like RSD and I'd have to imagine that RSD isn't going to punish small shops that haven't reopened due to COVID still. The last few haven't penalized stores for posting online as long as it's not until RSD.
 

RHANDMJ

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My local still isn't really open especially for an event like RSD and I'd have to imagine that RSD isn't going to punish small shops that haven't reopened due to COVID still. The last few haven't penalized stores for posting online as long as it's not until RSD.
We'll see what happens. Stil in a fluid situation everywhere.
 

Ericj32

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I think the Charlie Parker was originally slated for last year, there's a bit of info here:

Well, I didn't think I was interested in that 4LP Bird in LA set, but after reading the article, I'm now aware that I've already been purchasing a lot of the special releases for his centennial celebration. The fact that it's the only July RSD release I'm even considering might make it easier to hold off, though.
 

mingerton

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I recently read this book:


and now have a new appreciation for why the appearance of Parker in LA was so impactful on musicians there but also on him, despite a stint in a drug rehab hospital while out there. Will definitely check out this release, whereas before reading about it I would have been indifferent to yet another Parker reissue.




Well, I didn't think I was interested in that 4LP Bird in LA set, but after reading the article, I'm now aware that I've already been purchasing a lot of the special releases for his centennial celebration. The fact that it's the only July RSD release I'm even considering might make it easier to hold off, though.
 

Selaws

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I recently read this book:


and now have a new appreciation for why the appearance of Parker in LA was so impactful on musicians there but also on him, despite a stint in a drug rehab hospital while out there. Will definitely check out this release, whereas before reading about it I would have been indifferent to yet another Parker reissue.
Sweet, I have this ready to read. Thanks for the reminding me of it.
 

agutierrezb

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View attachment 95080
I've been streaming this for a while, so it's nice to get hold of the vinyl after a few delays. Was worth the wait.
I'm a big fan of most of Antonio Sánchez's projects, but I haven't really listened to this one with the attention it deserves. I'll stream it during the weekend and see if I'm interested in ordering the vinyl too.
 

mingerton

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Sweet, I have this ready to read. Thanks for the reminding me of it.
Also, there's an appendix of "50 representative west coast jazz recordings 1945-1960." The book is from the early 90s so it doesn't account for some more recent reissues. But still, it's useful and has some unexpected choices. For example this Art Pepper recording:


Originally recorded for Omegatape in 1957, the company released it as reel-to-reel in the hopes that its new technology would become a new popular music format. It was only when reissued on LP in Japan in the 70s and a US reissue in 1985 that more than a handful of people got to hear it.
 

HuddieLedbetter

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KenKaniff

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A newly-discovered live performance by Bill Evans Trio, featuring Eddie Gómez on bass and Eliot Zigmund on drums. The previously unreleased concert took place on June 20, 1975, at Oil Can Harry’s, Vancouver, BC. Captured for radio host Gary Barclay, it was aired on his popular CHQM jazz show. For nearly half a century, the tapes lay forgotten – until now. Thanks to audio restoration by Plangent Processes and meticulous mastering by Paul Blakemore, it sounds just as fresh today as it did in 1975.


Bundles too.
 

Selaws

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A newly-discovered live performance by Bill Evans Trio, featuring Eddie Gómez on bass and Eliot Zigmund on drums. The previously unreleased concert took place on June 20, 1975, at Oil Can Harry’s, Vancouver, BC. Captured for radio host Gary Barclay, it was aired on his popular CHQM jazz show. For nearly half a century, the tapes lay forgotten – until now. Thanks to audio restoration by Plangent Processes and meticulous mastering by Paul Blakemore, it sounds just as fresh today as it did in 1975.


Bundles too.
Damn, there's been a lot of 'newly discovered' Evans stuff over the past few years. Interesting line-up on this one for sure.

On a side note, it's crazy that it's cheaper for me to buy from the US store rather than the UK even with shipping. It's a common theme lately where label's UK sites list the record at the same figure as the US, just in GBP. The conversion is crazy.

With this Evans release, I could buy it from their US site for $47.13 with international shipping (£34.30) OR buy from the UK site for £38.99 with the cheapest shipping ($53.57). Cant help but feel like internationals are getting shafted here.
 

agutierrezb

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Man, this Floating Points/Pharoah Sanders album is really good. The balance between the repetition of chords and Sanders's passionate delivery is *chef's kiss*. Also, the moment Sanders starts his weird humming-singing on Movement 4 is absolutely beautiful. It's like he has explored all the expressive possiblities of his horn, and has fallen short to convey what he intended, thus transitioning to his own voice. AOTY contender fo' sho'.
 
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mingerton

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Man, this Floating Points/Pharoah Sanders album is really good. The balance between the repetition of chords and Sanders's impassioned delivery is *chef's kiss*. Also, the moment Sanders starts his weird humming-singing on Movement 4 is absolutely beautiful. It's like he has explored all the expressive possiblities of his horn, and has fallen short to convey what he intended, thus transitioning to his own voice. AOTY contender fo' sho'.

This will surely be an unpopular take but I bought this album last week (great cover art, BTW), listened to it twice, and my take away was just meh.

I thought the Floating Points contribution was limited 1-2 repetitive motifs that were not very interesting. Side two gets a bit more complex when the orchestra enters. And of course I like Sanders, but at times his sax at times felt imported like it was a 1980s film soundtrack. Maybe it will get better with more listens and I don't get the subtlety?

By contrast, this album came in the mail over the weekend:


And I absolutely love it -- just so much more compelling as a spiritual jazz concept. And shout to all the Gearbox label fans on this thread; without you, I doubt this album would have been on my radar.
 

Selaws

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This will surely be an unpopular take but I bought this album last week (great cover art, BTW), listened to it twice, and my take away was just meh.

I thought the Floating Points contribution was limited 1-2 repetitive motifs that were not very interesting. Side two gets a bit more complex when the orchestra enters. And of course I like Sanders, but at times his sax at times felt imported like it was a 1980s film soundtrack. Maybe it will get better with more listens and I don't get the subtlety?

By contrast, this album came in the mail over the weekend:


And I absolutely love it -- just so much more compelling as a spiritual jazz concept. And shout to all the Gearbox label fans on this thread; without you, I doubt this album would have been on my radar.
Oh man, I LOVE this Sarathy Korwar album. Certainly my favourite of his that he has released so far. Going to have to dig it out to listen to now, thanks for the reminder.
 

bother

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This will surely be an unpopular take but I bought this album last week (great cover art, BTW), listened to it twice, and my take away was just meh.

I thought the Floating Points contribution was limited 1-2 repetitive motifs that were not very interesting. Side two gets a bit more complex when the orchestra enters. And of course I like Sanders, but at times his sax at times felt imported like it was a 1980s film soundtrack. Maybe it will get better with more listens and I don't get the subtlety?

100% agree. Listened twice and was totally bored. I felt like it was kind of generic and uninteresting. Sanders played fine-- his parts were by far the best.
 

agutierrezb

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This will surely be an unpopular take but I bought this album last week (great cover art, BTW), listened to it twice, and my take away was just meh.

I thought the Floating Points contribution was limited 1-2 repetitive motifs that were not very interesting. Side two gets a bit more complex when the orchestra enters. And of course I like Sanders, but at times his sax at times felt imported like it was a 1980s film soundtrack. Maybe it will get better with more listens and I don't get the subtlety?

By contrast, this album came in the mail over the weekend:


And I absolutely love it -- just so much more compelling as a spiritual jazz concept. And shout to all the Gearbox label fans on this thread; without you, I doubt this album would have been on my radar.

100% agree. Listened twice and was totally bored. I felt like it was kind of generic and uninteresting. Sanders played fine-- his parts were by far the best.

I can totally get where you guys are coming from, and I fully respect that view. The album is indeed very "samey" throughout its 46 minutes. In that sense it's much more an ambient album that a jazz one. I find it to have a very meditative quality in its exploration of a couple of motifs with different arrangements, textures and instrumentation. Sanders's contribution is what makes the album especial for me, as it goes further than any other instrument in search of different moods whithin the confines of the repeting motifs, but without ever hijacking the whole performance and taking it too far of its oceanic feel. I guess that is the best analogy I can find for this album: it's like being on a boat, where after a certain time you forget about the constant swing of the ocean, and you can pay attention to the little nuances of the water's color, sound and movement.
 
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